A war won or lost ?
Dictionary definitions of win

1.  To achieve victory, to be the winner in a contest, to be victorious
2.  To achieve success in an effort or venture
3.  To take in battle; capture, gain, advance, gain ground, obtain advantages
4.  To succeed or prevail.
5.  To win through, to overcome difficulties and attain a desired goal or end.
6.   To win the day, to be successful, acquire, win, gain, win something through one's efforts
7.  To gain victory in (a battle, argument, or struggle)
It is many years on from the end of the Vietnam War, yet many Australians consider that the Australian troops - both Regular Army soldiers and National Servicemen - lost their war in South Vietnam.
Nothing could be further from the truth !

Australia's tactical area of operation was Phuoc Tuy Province, as recorded in 'A Brief History of the Australian Forces in Vietnam' by Shane Fontana© 1995.
Quote: '
The two major ground units were called the 1st Australian Task  Force and the 1st Australian Logistic Support Group. The principal infantry  units of the Task Force were the 5th and 6th Battalions, the Royal Australian Regiment and the 3rd Special Air Service Squadron. The artillery regiment contained two Australian batteries and one New Zealand battery.
The Task Force was given it's own tactical area of responsibility in Phuoc Tuy Province, south-east of Saigon and the Task Force headquarters was established in a rubber plantation at Nui Dat just north of the provincial capital Baria, about 35 miles south-west of Saigon (
now Ho Chi Minh City).'

The career soldiers and conscripts that fought in the conflicts in their tactical area of responsibility, Phuoc Tuy, overcame the enemy and secured the province.
The exploits of 6 RAR in the Battle of Long Tan, and that of 4 RAR/NZ at Nui Le are examples of the Australian troops victories over numerically superior enemy forces, and their exploits, in the finest traditions of ANZAC, are deserving of admiration and respect.

But it is not only in these two battles that the Australian troops won the contest.

Without exception,
every operation conducted by the battalions of the Royal Australian Regiment in South Vietnam resulted in defeat of the enemy. The enemy, whether Viet Cong or North Vietnamese Army (NVA) regulars, lost more casualties, food and weaponry, the destruction of bunker complexes, the loss of ground and withdrawal from the field of conflict.
The enemy lost in every contact. And the Australian battalions remained in control of their designated area of responsibility.
(For an example of Australian battalions' superiority over the enemy click  HERE )

Referring to the above dictionary definitions of 'win', in sequence, and applying them to the Australian battalions' results in Phuoc Tuy Province, South Vietnam;
1. To achieve victory, to be the winner in a contest, to be victorious
The Australian and New Zealand troops, and their support units, won every contest, were therefore victorious, and achieved victory.
2. To achieve success in an effort or venture
The Australian and New Zealand troops, and their support units, achieved success in every venture, by inflicting losses on the enemy.
3. To take in battle; capture, gain, advance, gain ground, obtain advantages
The Australian and New Zealand troops, and their support units, captured enemy armaments and provisions, and secured the ground.
4.  To succeed or prevail.
The Australian and New Zealand troops, and their support units, prevailed in Phuoc Tuy Province.
5.  To win through, to overcome difficulties and attain a desired goal or end.
The Australian and New Zealand troops, and their support units, attained their desired objective in securing their tactical area of responsibility.
6.   To win the day, to be successful, acquire, win, gain, win something through one's efforts
The Australian and New Zealand troops, and their support units, won control of their tactical area of responsibility, Phuoc Tuy Province.
7.  To gain victory in (a battle, argument, or struggle)
And, the Australian and New Zealand troops, and their support units, won every combat against the enemy, either Viet Cong or NVA regulars.

In every sense of the word 'win', the Australian and New Zealand forces in South Vietnam were the victors. They truly won their war.

It was others that lost their war in their tactical area of responsibility or commitment, and this distinction should never be overlooked, or forgotten.
Posted in honour of all Australians and New Zealanders who served, and especially those who gave their lives, in South Vietnam